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Family & Consumer Science

 

"Proud Traditions, with Vision for the Future"


Family & Consumer Science, F.C.S., has come a long way in the last few years
in school districts all over the country.  F.C.S. is the heart of curriculum: 
the skills and concepts taught in math, reading, writing, science, and social
studies are integrated, enriched, and applied to practical real-life experiences
in the F.C.S. classroom.  
For this reason, F.C.S. plays an active role in developing
the skills needed for the P.S.S.A. and complements overall instruction at
Neshaminy. 
F.C.S. has recently updated and aligned the curriculum at both
the middle and high school level with the Pennsylvania F.C.S. Academic
Standards, which include the most important skills and behaviors students
need for the future.

 

Financial and Resource Management

"Today's students need the skills to manage money so that they can continually
provide for themselves and their families.
  They need shopping and consumer
skills to purchase goods (often via the internet) and maintain these goods
while practicing their consumer rights and responsibilities."*


Balancing Family, Work & Community Responsibilities

"Today's students need the skills to become responsible and contributing family
members, productive problem solvers, responsible citizens, quality workers, and
continuing learners."*
 

Food Science and Nutrition

"Today's students need the skills to make good and healthy choices regarding the
nutrition and safety of food for themselves and their families"
.*

Child Development and Parenting

"Today's students need the skills to become nurturing and responsible
parents and caregivers who provide opportunities for children to grow
and learn in a fast paced world."*
 

Career & Work

"Today's students need to plan and prepare for a rewarding career that will
suit their interests and aptitudes. They need the skills to both acquire and
retain employment in today's competitive workforce."*

 
* Quotes taken from the New York Times, "Views on American Education", Sept. 18, 2001